The Firecracker Boys: H-Bombs, Inupiat Eskimos, and the Roots of the Environmental Movement

The Firecracker Boys H Bombs Inupiat Eskimos and the Roots of the Environmental Movement In Edward Teller father of the H bomb unveiled his plan to detonate six nuclear bombs off the Alaskan coast to create a new harbor However the plan was blocked by a handful of Eskimos and bio

  • Title: The Firecracker Boys: H-Bombs, Inupiat Eskimos, and the Roots of the Environmental Movement
  • Author: Dan O'Neill
  • ISBN: 9780465003488
  • Page: 226
  • Format: Paperback
  • In 1958, Edward Teller, father of the H bomb, unveiled his plan to detonate six nuclear bombs off the Alaskan coast to create a new harbor However, the plan was blocked by a handful of Eskimos and biologists who succeeded in preventing massive nuclear devastation potentially far greater than that of the Chernobyl blast The Firecracker Boys is a story of the U.S governmeIn 1958, Edward Teller, father of the H bomb, unveiled his plan to detonate six nuclear bombs off the Alaskan coast to create a new harbor However, the plan was blocked by a handful of Eskimos and biologists who succeeded in preventing massive nuclear devastation potentially far greater than that of the Chernobyl blast The Firecracker Boys is a story of the U.S government s arrogance and deception, and the brave people who fought against it launching America s environmental movement As one of Alaska s most prominent authors, Dan O Neill brings to these pages his love of Alaska s landscape, his skill as a nature and science writer, and his determination to expose one of the most shocking chapters of the Nuclear Age.

    • ☆ The Firecracker Boys: H-Bombs, Inupiat Eskimos, and the Roots of the Environmental Movement || ✓ PDF Read by ã Dan O'Neill
      226 Dan O'Neill
    • thumbnail Title: ☆ The Firecracker Boys: H-Bombs, Inupiat Eskimos, and the Roots of the Environmental Movement || ✓ PDF Read by ã Dan O'Neill
      Posted by:Dan O'Neill
      Published :2019-07-12T06:18:08+00:00

    About "Dan O'Neill"

    1. Dan O'Neill

      Dan O'Neill Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the The Firecracker Boys: H-Bombs, Inupiat Eskimos, and the Roots of the Environmental Movement book, this is one of the most wanted Dan O'Neill author readers around the world.

    952 thoughts on “The Firecracker Boys: H-Bombs, Inupiat Eskimos, and the Roots of the Environmental Movement”

    1. While the book was, at times, repetitive, at other times it was simply amazing. The author brought to life the fact that in the 1960s American scientists might have detonated multiple nuclear warheads in Bush Alaska basically to just see what happened. The fact that they didn't have a real purpose, other than to see what happened, permission to be on the land, or a conscious about the people/animals/environment that they would have irreparably harmed didn't seem to cross their minds. The author [...]


    2. Living in Alaska, by the time I started to show interest about "The Firecracker Boys", a lot of the people I know had already read it. Most of them said that it was very interesting, but also dry. Iagree only partially with this statement. The story about American scientists wanting to blow up a hole (supposedly to make a harbor) on the coast of Alaska using nuclear bombs sounds almost taken out of a bad sci-fi story. So, knowing that this almost happened, and all the institutional lies that acc [...]



    3. On my recent (and only) trip to Alaska, a friend took us to a wonderful play about the history of Alaska as seen through Inuit eyes. The play transformed my entire view of Alaska and the Arctic and gave me an exciting new approach to our entire trip. This book continues that experience. It tells the story of the United States’ AEC attempt to use Alaska as a testing ground for nuclear weapons. It tells the story of how we (as a people, as a nation) have not been able to see the world except thr [...]


    4. In the 1961 Atomic Energy Commission led by Edward Teller wanted to use a nuclear bomb to create a harbor not far from Point Hope, Alaska. The University of Alaska fired scientists whose research pointed to the risk to people and the environment. O'Neill presents a shocking and comprehensive history of this episode: a good case study of how the promise of big federal spending beguiles - Alaska's biggest newspapers and the university failed to train a critical eye on this insane venture. Book als [...]


    5. Incredibly well researched, very easy to read, great way to learn a bit more about the mentality of nuclear testing in the moment highly recommend. It's more than just the story of Edward Teller, in fact he's an important, but not necessarily central to the plot, because it more follows the community resistance efforts of a few key players (UA Fairbanks researchers contracted by the AEC to gather environmental data a few members from the local community in question: Point Hope a few outsiders wh [...]


    6. If you are interested in Environmental issues, the Cold War, or just want to read a book of great about a non-publicized significant part of Alaska history this is the book for you. Fantastic read that shouldn't be missed.


    7. A story about what can happen with the unchecked arrogance of government. The most unfortunate part of the story is that it is all true.


    8. In 1956 the Suez Canal was nationalized which prompted the British and French to attach Egypt in order to secure the strategic passage. Although the conflict was ultimately settled by the United Nations, transportation through this region was halted for many months and the industrialized economies needed an alternative transportation route. During this same period the US and the Soviet Union were testing nuclear bombs and international community was requesting nuclear test-bans. Until reading th [...]


    9. I was shocked to find out that there are actually people who are so casual about nuclear radiation. The people portrayed working for the AEC seem to have no humanity - to be so caught up in advancing their agenda that they have lost all scruples. I imagine secret police from repressive regimes having the same level of concern for human beings.I really got interested in the book about half way through. The first part was not that easy for me to read. Reading the methods at the end of the book, it [...]


    10. The book contains a lot of information, more than I wanted to absorb sometime, but I think it is an important example of how an entity gets carried away with excitement about something that goes completely against common sense. It also serves as a demonstration on how organizations (governmental or private - see Pebble Partnership) have the nerve of lying into the face of the people about environmental and health hazards, some even before they have been reasonably evaluated. Consequently, once t [...]


    11. This amazing book is astonishingly researched, well-documented, and still a page-turning story. It can be dry, but moreover is revealing in the way the government, especially the Atomic Energy Commission, is as transparent as a pile of rock. Don't be put off by the length of this book, at 427 pages; the actual story is a mere 291 pages. The rest of the book is incredibly detailed Epilogue (which I found at times more fascinating than the "book" itself), Afterword, Methodology, Acknowledgments, N [...]


    12. I highly, highly recommend this book; extremely well researched and well written. Though the writing style is as even-handed and moderate as it comes, the weight of the evidence shows an Atomic Energy Commission that threw scientific rigor to the winds in trying to push its own testing agenda, and a political and higher-ed establishment that happily went along on this dangerous and damaging ride, Yee-hawing all the way like Major Kong riding the back of his bomb in Dr. Strangelove. But O'Neill a [...]


    13. This took me forever to read but I stuck through it for two main reasons1) I met the author and he signed my copy so I wanted to complete it before putting back on the shelf2) I hoped I would encounter more Point Hope content in regards to the Inupiaq's role in stopping Project Chariot.I rarely received enough of this angle to be satisfied. Shoot. I am aware of more about nuclear technology and nuclear "politics" than I ever thought possible. It was impressive to realize Alaska's role and import [...]


    14. This book was a real eye-opener for me, as I had no idea that there was such a strong push to use nuclear blasts for such peace-time efforts as creating a new harbor or making a new Panama Canal. WHAT WERE THEY THINKING???? The strength of this book was the section of that explored the Natives initial response to the blast that was going to be in their favored hunting area; by the end of the book the author's focus seemed to get fuzzy--probably (maybe the info coming out of the AEC was so fuzzy! [...]


    15. this was a great book and a true eye opener of how untruthful our government has been in the past( as we are all very aware of) and what has been destroyed from nuclear waste in the name of peace. And here I thought eating strictly game meat up here in alaska would be so healthy, only to find out, there is a chance I am also eating nuclear waste chemicals in my meat. ug. a fascinating history of not only alaska, but of the cold war itself. a must read!


    16. Very interesting book about the Atomic Energy Commission's plan in 1958 to use an atomic bomb to make a deep water, commercial port in Northern Alaska. However, the government's plans were 'dashed' because the native Eskimos protested and this led to the first environmental study undertaken by the US Government. The efforts of the Eskimos thwarted this project proving that the effects of detonating an atomic bomb would permanently devastate the Alaskan wilderness.


    17. A relatively easy read for a potentially dense subject, this book delivers a well-researched account of a domestic nuclear project that is sadly under-reported. It was at times shocking to read about what government scientists thought was a reasonable plan to use nuclear excavation in Alaska in the 1960s.


    18. The author does a good job of keeping what could at times be dry factual recitation quite lively.He also does a good job letting events speak for themselves, rather than going "OMG the government was screwing them around!"The sad part here is that both the state and federal government attitudes remain unchanged with respect to resource extraction.


    19. At times this book was wonky and slow moving, but then I was hooked. I was particularly fascinated by the stifling of academic freedom and discounting of academic research regarding the potential impact of atomic testing on the Alaskan coast. Perseverance paid off in the end.





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