A Poet's Sourcebook: Writings about Poetry, from the Ancient World to the Present

A Poet s Sourcebook Writings about Poetry from the Ancient World to the Present A collection of writings about poetry from both ancient and contemporary writers including Homer Plato Aristotle William Shakespeare William Wordsworth John Keats Edgar Allan Poe Frederick Doug

  • Title: A Poet's Sourcebook: Writings about Poetry, from the Ancient World to the Present
  • Author: Dawn Potter
  • ISBN: 9781932870770
  • Page: 434
  • Format: Paperback
  • A collection of writings about poetry from both ancient and contemporary writers including Homer, Plato, Aristotle, William Shakespeare, William Wordsworth, John Keats, Edgar Allan Poe, Frederick Douglass, Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Ezra Pound, Philip Levine, Adrienne Rich, Gary Snyder, and Rita Dove

    • [PDF] Download ☆ A Poet's Sourcebook: Writings about Poetry, from the Ancient World to the Present | by ↠ Dawn Potter
      434 Dawn Potter
    • thumbnail Title: [PDF] Download ☆ A Poet's Sourcebook: Writings about Poetry, from the Ancient World to the Present | by ↠ Dawn Potter
      Posted by:Dawn Potter
      Published :2019-08-24T17:19:04+00:00

    About "Dawn Potter"

    1. Dawn Potter

      Dawn Potter directs the Frost Place Conference on Poetry and Teaching, held each summer at Robert Frost s home in Franconia, New Hampshire She is the author or editor of seven books of poetry and prose, most recently Same Old Story CavanKerry Press, 2014 Her poems and essays appear in major journals in the United States and abroad, and she works often as a visiting poet in the schools She lives in Harmony, Maine, with photographer Thomas Birtwistle and their two sons.

    740 thoughts on “A Poet's Sourcebook: Writings about Poetry, from the Ancient World to the Present”

    1. Like many other such books, A Poet's Sourcebook includes essays and excerpts about poetry from a variety of writers/thinkers, many of which I've read before. That said, tucked among those are surprises from other times, other cultures, letter excerpts, etc. Not all these pieces "did it" for me, but most of them got me thinking about poetry and why I do it, and how, more importantly I might do it better--more mindfully, more thoughtfully--and, perhaps, how I might teach it better.



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