Michelangelo: The Artist, the Man and His Times

Michelangelo The Artist the Man and His Times Michelangelo is universally recognized to be one of the greatest artists of all time In this vividly written biography William E Wallace offers a substantially new view of the artist Not only a supre

  • Title: Michelangelo: The Artist, the Man and His Times
  • Author: William E. Wallace
  • ISBN: 9780521111997
  • Page: 360
  • Format: Hardcover
  • Michelangelo is universally recognized to be one of the greatest artists of all time In this vividly written biography, William E Wallace offers a substantially new view of the artist Not only a supremely gifted sculptor, painter, architect, and poet, Michelangelo was also an aristocrat who firmly believed in the ancient and noble origins of his family The belief in hiMichelangelo is universally recognized to be one of the greatest artists of all time In this vividly written biography, William E Wallace offers a substantially new view of the artist Not only a supremely gifted sculptor, painter, architect, and poet, Michelangelo was also an aristocrat who firmly believed in the ancient and noble origins of his family The belief in his patrician status fueled his lifelong ambition to improve his family s financial situation and to raise the social standing of artists Michelangelo s ambitions are evident in his writing, dress, and comportment, as well as in his ability to befriend, influence, and occasionally say no to popes, kings, and princes Written from the words of Michelangelo and his contemporaries, this biography not only tells his own stories but also brings to life the culture and society of Renaissance Florence and Rome Not since Irving Stone s novel The Agony and the Ecstasy has there been such a compelling and human portrayal of this remarkable yet credible human individual.Subscribe to William Wallace s podcast on individual works of the master Click here Episodes every week, right from this bookmark or your feed reader.

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      Published :2020-01-17T12:35:44+00:00

    About "William E. Wallace"

    1. William E. Wallace

      William E. Wallace Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Michelangelo: The Artist, the Man and His Times book, this is one of the most wanted William E. Wallace author readers around the world.

    565 thoughts on “Michelangelo: The Artist, the Man and His Times”

    1. This ended up being just okay for me. It's certainly well-researched, careful, sober and authoritative, so that's nice. But I have two issues, both of which are sorta bigger than just this book:1) I only read this one book about Michelangelo, which means it's hard for me to know whether Wallace's take is entirely the right one. I have no dissenting opinion, you know? In this case, my uncertainty is about Michelangelo's homosexuality. From what I've heard (including from Michelangelo himself, in [...]


    2. Michelangelo was a true Renaissance Man. This book follows him through out his life, with documented letters he wrote to family and friends. He was not as crabby as other biographers made him out to be. He was a loving friend and family man, even though his family depended on him for their support.This book follows him through all stages of his artistic careers . He was a sculptor, painter, poet,architect, building engineer, structural engineer and his own contractor. I wish the book had more ph [...]


    3. William Wallace, a professor of art history at Washington University in St. Louis, is widely considered America’s preeminent authority on Michelangelo. In an array of scholarly books and articles written over the past 20 years, he has argued for a fundamental reassessment of the great Renaissance master’s personal and professional character. Through Wallace’s meticulously documented research and analysis, Michelangelo has emerged not as the isolated, brooding loner of legend, but as an ent [...]


    4. Having recently taken Wallace’s Teaching Company course on Michelangelo, I welcomed reading his new biography. In fact, the book paralleled the course so closely that it ended up being a helpful review and reprise of the course material, clarifying and amplifying much of the course. Wallace has an engaging and conversational style, nonetheless basing his work solidly on original sources, particularly Michelangelo’s voluminous correspondence. His aim is to present Michelangelo as a man, delvi [...]


    5. Somewhat of a disappointment. The first page made me believe this book was going to be creative nonfiction. I was wrong, which led to my let-down.It needs a good edit too and Cambridge University Press should be ashamed at the mistakes that were left.The other complaint I have is the illustrations -- far too few given the subject of the biography; they were all collected at the front of the book; and they were in black and white. Cheap, I'd say.Despite all those whinges, I still finished the boo [...]


    6. So much missingI have loved this man Michelangelo, since I was a young girl. The book is not well rounded. It did not touch on his youth to any substantial level. A disappointment.



    7. Michelangelo Made Dull: I was so looking forward to a solid well written biography of Michelangelo to add to my knowledge of the man and his art. But, alas, I found this to be "solid" in having lots of details about his life but poorly written--without verve, dull, dull, dull. And I have the hardback version and there are NO illustrations. I read the book constantly going online to check on the pieces of art. Reading non-fiction or fictional history of artists is one of my greatest joys. I am so [...]


    8. Oscar Wilde once said, "I think a man should invent his own myth." One man for whom it could be said that he did this, at least indirectly through his contributions, is Michelangelo. He was born on March 6, 1475, in Caprese, Italy to a family of moderate means in the banking business. He became an apprentice to a painter before studying in the sculpture gardens of the powerful Medici family. What followed was a remarkable career as an artist in the Italian Renaissance, recognized in his own time [...]


    9. Great read. I learned so much. (Read in anticipation of my upcoming trip to Sicily, Rome and Florence). It would have been nice to have learned more about his early life, how he got to be so good so very early--carved the famousBacchus age 22, the very famous Pieta at St Peters at age 24 or so, David before he was 30--little training at all it seems. He was not only a sculpture but a painter (the Sistine Chapel ceiling!) and an architect--worked on design of St. Peters the last more the decade o [...]


    10. In truth I am not really sure who the book is for - the average reader or the scholar? First of all, the chapter on Michelangelo's typical week was a ground-breaking article of the same title about two decades (or more) ago, and the article (original source) can easily be found on JSTOR. So, why should the scholar use the book's chapter (a secondary source) when the article is available?Secondly, the narrative assumes the reader knows about the artist's life already. Hence the book's focus on Mi [...]


    11. While I enjoyed this breezy biography, I wish it had been more substantial when it came to describing Michelangelo's art; it's difficult to see what he contributed to the Renaissance from the mostly superficial descriptions of his work in the book. Wallace spends much more time describing contracts, logistics, and Michelangelo's testy relationship with his nephew, which is understandable because the book is based on the artist's correspondence, but it ends up minimizing his achievements. I would [...]


    12. When most art history books are an analysis of the artist's work and the biography is pushed along only by each piece, this book was mostly about Michelangelo's life outside his studio(as the title suggests). After years of art history classes, looking at the man, Michelangelo, beyond the context of his works was refreshing, as I already know quite a lot aesthetically about his pieces. Most of the book is generated from Michelangelo's own writings, his poetry, records, and letters to and from fa [...]


    13. A sober academic treatment of Michelangelo's life arguing the case that the interpretations of Michelangelo as a tortured gay man, and as an irascible curmudgeon and loner, are overdrawn. Focuses on letters to and from Michelangelo, and I was slightly disappointed that there was not much related about the artist's techniques.


    14. This is written by an art scholar at Washington Universuty. It reads like a Master's thesis So, it is rather dry. That being said, it really gives me a great understanding of what it meant to be a sculpture back inthe Renaissance times. And, I learned that he was an incredible poet!




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