Four Great Plays: Ghosts / The Wild Duck / An Enemy of the People / A Doll's House

Four Great Plays Ghosts The Wild Duck An Enemy of the People A Doll s House Here in a single volume are four major plays by the first modern playwright Henrik Ibsen Ghosts the startling portrayal of a family destroyed by disease and infidelity The Wild Duck A poignant dram

  • Title: Four Great Plays: Ghosts / The Wild Duck / An Enemy of the People / A Doll's House
  • Author: Henrik Ibsen Robert Farquharson Sharp John Gassner
  • ISBN: 9780553212808
  • Page: 250
  • Format: Paperback
  • Here, in a single volume, are four major plays by the first modern playwright, Henrik Ibsen Ghosts the startling portrayal of a family destroyed by disease and infidelity The Wild Duck A poignant drama of lost illusions An Enemy Of The People Ibsen s vigorous attack on public opinion And A Doll s House the play that scandalized the Victorian world with its unspHere, in a single volume, are four major plays by the first modern playwright, Henrik Ibsen Ghosts the startling portrayal of a family destroyed by disease and infidelity The Wild Duck A poignant drama of lost illusions An Enemy Of The People Ibsen s vigorous attack on public opinion And A Doll s House the play that scandalized the Victorian world with its unsparing views of love and marriage, featuring one of the most controversial heroines and one of the most famous exits in the literature of the stagepAlthough Ibsen outraged many of his contemporaries, he persisted he shocked the unthinking into thinking and blasted through the thick fog of convention to the restless human passions hidden underneath Today his plays remain masterpieces of psychological insight and theatrical power.

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      Posted by:Henrik Ibsen Robert Farquharson Sharp John Gassner
      Published :2019-07-17T06:24:45+00:00

    About "Henrik Ibsen Robert Farquharson Sharp John Gassner"

    1. Henrik Ibsen Robert Farquharson Sharp John Gassner

      Henrik Johan Ibsen was a major Norwegian playwright largely responsible for the rise of modern realistic drama He is often referred to as the father of modern drama Ibsen is held to be the greatest of Norwegian authors and one of the most important playwrights of all time, celebrated as a national symbol by Norwegians.His plays were considered scandalous to many of his era, when Victorian values of family life and propriety largely held sway in Europe and any challenge to them was considered immoral and outrageous Ibsen s work examined the realities that lay behind many facades, possessing a revelatory nature that was disquieting to many contemporaries.Ibsen largely founded the modern stage by introducing a critical eye and free inquiry into the conditions of life and issues of morality Victorian era plays were expected to be moral dramas with noble protagonists pitted against darker forces every drama was expected to result in a morally appropriate conclusion, meaning that goodness was to bring happiness, and immorality pain Ibsen challenged this notion and the beliefs of his times and shattered the illusions of his audiences.

    562 thoughts on “Four Great Plays: Ghosts / The Wild Duck / An Enemy of the People / A Doll's House”

    1. HELMER. Hello, my sweet! My little squirrel, my little turtledove!NORA. Will you cut it out?HELMER. Cut it out? Why? What’s the matter?NORA. This is hardly the time or the place.HELMER. In the bosom of my own home, with my lovely darling wife?NORA. You are mistaken. We are not at home.HELMER (looks around). Oh my God, you're right! Nora, where are we?NORA. We’re in a review.HELMER. A review, but… does that mean…?NORA. Yes; some second-rate hack on the internet is writing us now.HELMER. J [...]


    2. Four thoughtful plays. If you haven’t tried reading plays- I recommend it. Something different. Ibsen was way ahead of his time. These were written in the late 1800s but seem much more modern. The book’s editor talks about ‘drama of ideas’ and Ibsen certainly spun some heads with his new ideas about society’s closed mindedness at that time. He startles the viewer at every turn. Brilliantly written although if I were the director-much dialogue would be deleted!


    3. I had tried reading this collection of Ibsen plays years ago and found myself bored to near literal death. But I returned to it just recently with a, hopefully, more open mind. In a sense I’m glad, but in another it’s just a bit humbling and scarring. Ibsen depicts more or less normal people in his day and age destroyed by their societies values, and adherence to communal norms beyond logic, reason, and all but the most extreme tips of human compassion. And unlike many modern writers who see [...]



    4. Ibsen is one of those names you cannot help hearing in school, but despite having taken more than my share of literature and drama courses (for someone not majoring in the field) I knew nothing specific about him. This book addresses that reasonably well, as it contains a fair synopsis of his place in the literary world plus four plays written consecutively at what seems to have been the peak of his career. Of course, because it is four plays it is a collection, and that makes it more difficult [...]


    5. "The strongest man in the world is he who stands most alone." - Dr. Thomas Stockmann, AN ENEMY OF THE PEOPLE"I am half inclined to think we are all ghosts, Mr. Manders." - Mrs. Alving, GHOSTS



    6. Ghosts by Henrik IbsenIbsen and happinessGhosts can be positive and negative. There’s a Hollywood movie called Ghost, I believe, where in the lead role we have Patrick Swayze, who plays a very decent and…loving ghost. Ibsen being rather dark, the Ghosts we’re dealing with here are negative. This reminds me of an excellent French comedy Le goût des autres. At one point, this group of sophisticated intellectuals and actors was laughing at an industrialist, who knowing nothing about Ibsen wa [...]


    7. I roughly summarize these four plays as “be wary of truth: the discovery, the revealing, and the handling of it may make or break lives and spirits”. Before reading this book, I thought that the truth is nearly the absolute “good”, while illusions the absolute “bad”. The romantics talk about “truth” and “beauty”, yet this is that “truth” in the realm of subjective experience, largely in the aesthetic and philosophic realm. Here in Ibsen’s plays, the “truth” is bone- [...]


    8. I did not think I was going to like Ibsen. Before reading this collection I had seen A Doll's House and I found the ending really problematic, and that experience colored my expectations for Ibsen. But I was really pleased with Ghosts and An Enemy of the People, which I think are excellent plays.I still have a problem with the end of A Doll's House, mostly because I feel like Nora critiques Torvald for things she has encouraged him to do throughout the play (e.g she refers to herself using his a [...]


    9. Very good playwright! Though frankly I ought to go see them performed. Best reviewed play by play: The Doll’s Room – ahead of its time, though even today it begs the question of whether leaving behind one’s children is worth it. Excellently captures one of those moments that, like an unexpected suicide, just happens as if naturally and there’s nothing one can do about it. Ghosts – my personal favourite. Flowing with all kinds of emotion and dubious decisions, Ibsen had a helluva mind t [...]


    10. A Norwegian student visiting our grad school for the year was the motivation for reading these plays. John Gassner's introduction was incredibly helpful in achieving the right frame of reference for delving into Ibsen and his exposure and call for the truth behind Victorian Society's veil. The character development got better with each play as his writing style (or perhaps bitterness) matured, and it was always fun to see how each particular vendetta was developed. I don't read plays often so th [...]


    11. I don't know how I made it through 4 years of undergrad in a theatre program without ever having to read "A Doll's House." I'd always heard the reference to the most shocking exit in modern playwrighting, but I can now place it in its true context. Nora is a bit cloying, what with her whole performing squirrell routine, but she's got cajones. I orginially got this collection for an acting class. I was assigned the scene in "An Enemy of the People" when Petra stands up to Hovstad about the book h [...]


    12. My collection includes John Gabriel Borkman instead of The Wild Duck. Nonetheless, poignant is a word that describes this play too. Quite a pessimist look at the redundancy of a generation trying to retain its hold on the next, finding meaning and validation through them, and the eventual breaking away by the youngsters to find themselves, not necessarily out of spite, but that's nature. Ghosts, much in the same strain, with some comic relief.Doll's House, a commentary on marriage, role of each [...]


    13. Ibsen wrote his plays when society was hidebound conservative and some things were given - and his plays, his thinking was like a lightening bolt. With such lightening bolts - there were others, from time to time - was light thrown on the dark state of the society and the rot at its foundation. Several great writers were influenced by Ibsen, amongst them George Bernard Shaw, who was a self described admirer and follower, a strong desciple, of Ibsen, a member of the Fabian Society in England - a [...]


    14. We read this in my AP Lit class, and I actually liked it. Some of the characters were really annoying, like Torvald. Oh my gosh, he was so patronizing and condescending and annoying. But, personally, I think Nora is kind of a boss. At least in the end. I liked the ending where she actually decided to grow a spine and get up and leave Torvald. And he deserved it. He certainly didn't deserve her. So, yeah, I liked the ending for the most part. I feel sorry for the kids, for not having thier Mom, b [...]


    15. I first read Ibsen in high school with Hedda Gabler. The plays in this collection are also full of Ibsen's witty and ironic commentary on society and its traditional values, which makes for a fun read. Nora in a doll's house presents a transformation from common to strong independent. The story of Mrs. Alving in Ghosts exposes the hypocrisy of Manders and going by the book. The Wild duck brings to light the illusions we live by and the harm that can be caused by meddlers. As for this particular [...]


    16. While tame in today's society, A Doll's House was one of the first plays to address feminist issues. Ibsen masterfully sets up a plot that allows the reader/viewer of the play to begin to understand what it was like for women in the 1800's and see how difficult it was for them to become independent. This is a great read with characters that are likable are well developed. It is much better than other feminist books I have read from the same or later time frames such as Madame Bovary and The Heid [...]


    17. Character quotes:"I don't imagine you will dispute the fact that at present the stupid people are in an absolutely overwhelming majority all the world over." --from An Enemy Of The People."Oh, law and order! I often think it is that that is at the bottom of all the misery of the world." --from Ghosts."One certainly is not called upon to account to every one for what one reads or thinks in the privacy of one's own room." ---Ghosts."Lately I have been taking stock of my internal economy. Bankrupt! [...]


    18. آثار نمایشی هنریک ایبسن مانند زندگی اش پر از فراز و نشیب اند. برخی منتقدان او را به راستی ستوده اند و برخی هرگز آثارش را نپسندیدند. ایبسن به معنایی که دکتر امیر حسین آریانپور در کتاب "ایبسن آشوب گرای" نوشته، چه در زندگی و چه در آثارش یک آنارشیست جلوه می کند. با وجودی که گفته اند ا [...]


    19. As I mentioned in another review of Ibsen, his works don't age that well. This play specifically I remember as quite groundbreaking for me, but going back to it 10 years later it feels less satisfying. However, I'm sure the message of female empowerment was really revolutionary for the time, and it's probably a good sign that the message feels quite obvious in this day and age.


    20. The world literature classes really enjoyed Ghosts and then read another play of their choice. Ghosts and Enemy of the People are my favorites. The Wild Duck was slow in the first half. Syphilis is a popular topic for discussion.


    21. I'm not normally one to read plays, but after our recent trip to Oslo, I wanted to read some from this Norwegian. Ibsen was known for his outspoken social commentaries in his writing and I certainly enjoyed how that came through in these plays!


    22. We read A Doll's House & An Enemy of the People, but all of Ibsen's plays seem very interesting. He has a way of making his point in a very clear way so that anyone can understand it. It's deep and yet not hard to find at all.


    23. I read two of the four, I loved the ideas and themes in them, I think Ibsen was ahead of his time! I'll enjoyed them, so I'll probably get around to reading the other two :)!



    24. Review of A Doll's House: The first two acts of this are so Victorian that it's absurd. Ending kicked ass though. Nora and Ayn Rand would have been cold lesbian lovers.



    25. I read these plays in high school and still have the book. I'm actually only rereading "The Wild Duck" right now, as LSC's "The Model" has referred to it and I have no memory of the play any longer.


    26. I've been a fan of Ibsen since I read "A Doll's House" in high school. Reading "Ghosts" for my final dramatic lit course was a real treat.


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