Longitudes and Attitudes: The World in the Age of Terrorism

Longitudes and Attitudes The World in the Age of Terrorism From the Pulitzer Prize winning New York Times columnist and bestselling author of From Beirut to Jerusalem and The Lexus and the Olive Tree comes this smart penetrating brilliantly informed book th

  • Title: Longitudes and Attitudes: The World in the Age of Terrorism
  • Author: Thomas L. Friedman Debbie Glasserman
  • ISBN: 9781400031252
  • Page: 416
  • Format: Paperback
  • From the Pulitzer Prize winning New York Times columnist and bestselling author of From Beirut to Jerusalem and The Lexus and the Olive Tree comes this smart, penetrating, brilliantly informed book that is indispensable for understanding today s radically new world and America s complex place in it.Thomas L Freidman received his third Pulitzer Prize in 2002 for his clariFrom the Pulitzer Prize winning New York Times columnist and bestselling author of From Beirut to Jerusalem and The Lexus and the Olive Tree comes this smart, penetrating, brilliantly informed book that is indispensable for understanding today s radically new world and America s complex place in it.Thomas L Freidman received his third Pulitzer Prize in 2002 for his clarity of vision, based on extensive reporting, in commenting on the worldwide impact of the terrorist threat In Longitudes and Attitudes he gives us all of the columns he has published about the most momentous news story of our time, as well as a diary of his private experiences and reflections during his post September 11 travels Updated for this new paperback edition, with over two years worth of Friedman s columns and an expanded version of his diary, Longitudes and Attitudes is a broadly influential work from our most trusted observer of the international scene.

    Longitudes and Attitudes Thomas L Friedman Exploring the World After September In the spring of , Thomas L Friedman won his third Pulitzer Prize for his clarity of vision, based on extensive reporting, in commenting on the worldwide impact of the terrorist threat after the attacks of September , . Contact Thomas L Friedman Thomas L Friedman Official site for Thomas Friedman, NY Times columnist and Pulitzer Prize winning author. Positive And Negative Attitudes Worksheets Printable Positive And Negative Attitudes Showing top worksheets in the category Positive And Negative Attitudes Some of the worksheets displayed are Positive negative facilitator note scenario, I have attitudes, Activity complete the work, Building positive attitudes in the workplace, Enthusiasm and attitude, Positive thinking exercise, Module lesson plan workplace skills, Asi mv work handouts. Map And Compass Worksheets Printable Worksheets Map And Compass Showing top worksheets in the category Map And Compass Some of the worksheets displayed are Map and compass work, Reading a map, Map compass skills, Compass work name date label the compass rose with, Lesson title make a magnetic compass, Compass points, Map and compass work spring name, Map compass skills. True North Thomas L Friedman Bestselling author and New York Times foreign affairs columnist Tom Friedman is known for his direct reporting and sophisticated analysis of complex issues facing the world Winner of three Pulitzer Prizes, he has covered stories from around the globe for The New York Times since . The Lexus and the Olive Tree The Lexus and the Olive Tree Understanding Globalization is a book by Thomas L Friedman that posits that the world is currently undergoing two struggles the drive for prosperity and development, symbolized by the Lexus LS, and the desire to retain identity and traditions, symbolized by the olive tree.He says he came to this realization while eating a sushi box lunch on a Japanese Thomas Friedman Thomas Loren Friedman f r i d m n born July , is an American political commentator and author.He is a three time Pulitzer Prize winner Friedman currently writes a weekly column for The New York Times.He has written extensively on foreign Culture of Lesotho history, people, clothing, women and the social problems associated with large construction sites Major Industries Lesotho has a wide variety of light industries, which include tire retreading, tapestry weaving, diamond processing, and production of textiles, electric lighting, candles, ceramics, explosives, furniture, and fertilizers. CPDLC Checklist Code One of the odd things about the CPDLC approval process is the FAA leaves the checklist up to you but doesn t know enough about data link to really QC yours. Ornitologa , la enciclopedia libre Hacia el final del siglo XVIII, Mathurin Jacques Brisson y Georges Louis Leclerc realizaron nuevos trabajos sobre aves Brssion public una obra, Ornithologie, de seis volmenes en y Leclerc incluy nueve volmenes sobre aves Histoire naturelle des oiseaux en su trabajo Histoire naturelle gnrale et particulire .

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    1. Thomas L. Friedman Debbie Glasserman

      Thomas L. Friedman Debbie Glasserman Is a well-known author, some of his books are a fascination for readers like in the Longitudes and Attitudes: The World in the Age of Terrorism book, this is one of the most wanted Thomas L. Friedman Debbie Glasserman author readers around the world.

    834 thoughts on “Longitudes and Attitudes: The World in the Age of Terrorism”

    1. This book won Thomas L. Friedman (born 1953) his third Pulitzer Award for Commentary in 2002 “for his clarity of vision, based on extensive reporting, in commenting on the worldwide impact of the terrorist threat.” That was his 3rd Pulitzer. Three years later he was elected to be a member of the Pulitzer Prize Board.This is the third book (first was The Lexus and the Olive Tree in 1991 and The World is Flat in 2005) by Friedman that I bought. But this is the first time that I finished readin [...]


    2. I tried really hard to finish this and just couldn't. Friedman's world "philosophy" is restricting and reductionist. He's a convincing writer, but doesn't make the effort to address fault-lines in his perfectly square little analogies and anecdotes. Like this gem that goes something along the lines of "India is a democratic country despite a large Muslim population, therefore traditional Middle Eastern countries must adapt NOW." He's also really adroit at setting up a pretty clear West vs the Re [...]


    3. This book follows Friedman's editorials from 2001-2003ish. It is interesting to watch a juggernaut of mideast intelligencia navigate the turmoil of sept 11, invasion of Iraq and violence in Isreal. From meetings with Saudi princes to sharing flights with powerful senators, Friedman weaves a cohesive story from our most confusing times.


    4. I had the distinct pleasure of being able to hear Friedman, the foreign affairs columnist for The New York Times, speak at the World Affairs Council in Dallas last Fall. An intelligent and eloquent speaker, Friedman was there to promote his new(est) book, Hot, Flat & Crowded, and discuss how America needs to undergo a green revolution. My mom had read The World is Flat when it first came out, but Longitudes & Attitudes was the only book available on PaperBackSwap and I figured I should r [...]


    5. Friedman is a talented writer, but extremely one sided. He does a good job trying to convince us that we, as readers, can fully understand difficult issues such as the causes of terrorism, the roles of madrassahs in the Afghan region, and the over-blown burqa while ignoring the fact that all these issues cannot possibly be understood without considering the many different cultural and religious contexts surrounding them! There were some good articles, but literally SOME. As in maybe one or two. [...]


    6. I thought this book had some good points, and some terrible ones as well. Overall, the writing was intriguing, and to watch the perspective shift over time was priceless. At times I enjoyed what Friedman had to say, and at other times was bothered at what seemed to be oversimplification of some very deep-seeded issues.


    7. I agree with 95% of what is written here. In fact a lot of what he has written, I intuitively thought about when I was daydreaming during medical school about the same time he wrote it.This is a collection of Friedman's articles from September 11 era. What strikes about the articles is Friedman places September 11 in context with supports and strengthen terrorism, namely the effects of globalization instead of the tunnel vision us vs. them mentality. I agree with his assessment that in order to [...]


    8. This book felt like two, disparate parts: A compilation from his New York Times columns and then a travelogue of encountering people in Saudi Arabia reacting to his writing. The first part I found very uninteresting. The columns I found poor; the snarky and jokey attitude and multiple mock letters seemed to trivialize and provided not real insight. They were not illustrative or enlightening, at all. I would give that two stars as its own book. I would give four stars to the second half where Fri [...]


    9. Here Thomas Friedman gives us all of the columns he has published about the most momentous news story of our time, as well as a diary of his private experiences and reflections during his post–September 11 travels. Friedman was in Jerusalem on 9/11. He knows the Middle East very, very well.I found his pre-9/11 columns very insightful, and he gives George W. Bush his support in the run up to Iraq, and then the war was handled the way that it was, and you know the rest.I found that this book was [...]


    10. I think the World was Flat gets 5 stars. Flat hot and crowded - 4, but rounded down. Lexus and the olive tree gets three. And this gets rounded up to a three. Unless you're a nut about 9/11s impacts on America this won't be the most exciting read ever. But, It's also kind of neat to hear a different tone in his writing. This book seemed less journalistic and more biographic and he brings out more of his own priorities (usually his two daughters) when interpreting the geopolitical situation today [...]


    11. good to read the raw emotions Friedman was feeling after 9/11 but Friedman ignores many of the nuance and complexities around the age we live in. For one American involvement in the middle east and the solution to the Israel/Palestine conflict. Friedman paints America as the forever 'good guy' and anyone against it as 'bad'. It's still good to see the feelings at that time and how things have played out 15 years later.


    12. Very interesting to read this book, which is a collection of Op-Eds written within a 9 month span after the 9/11 attacks, in the context we have now 16 years later. It is also sad to think that we still have troops fighting overseas so long after these columns appeared. Friedman's insights are always well thought out and written in a way that is engaging to read, but it is unfortunate that many of the recommendations and predictions have not come to bear in the time since they were written.


    13. a favorite author of mine but this topic was extremely interesting. Always impressed of his research, but the places he traveled for this book was amazing as well as the people he spoke with . Exposing the reasons for the Saudi denial was not a surprise but the response from The saudi prince was .


    14. The more I read Thomas Friedman the more I like him. He is intelligent, insightful, informed, and not afraid to tell it like it is. His agenda in this book is simple, if America wants to understand 9/11 and insure we never have another then we best learn whom we are fighting in this war and understand the divide between the Muslim and Western worlds.


    15. This book turned me on to Thomas Friedman. It is a collection of his Foreign Affairs Columns from the new York Times.I cannot recommend it highly enough if you are interested in gaining a solid (albeit preliminary and western slanted) understanding of the middle east.


    16. He is an excellent writer and I find this book interesting now to consider what has changed over the past 15 years.



    17. This is a collection of the Pulitzer Prize winning columns that Friedman wrote for the New York Times reflecting both on the factors that went into the events of September 11 and the world that it created. Like all of his work, these essays are marked by phenomenal insight and enormous intelligence. Most of these are available on Friedman's own website, but they are definitely worth owning in a bound volume. Over the years, I have found myself going back to his FROM BEIRUT TO JERUSALEM over and [...]


    18. An interesting and thought-provoking collection of essays.India is the 2nd most populous Muslim country, behind Indonesia. And example of a secular republic with a Muslim minority.Friedman's hopeful milestones for Iraq:- occupy Baghdad without destroying- capture Saddam- explain why some are still fighting- maintain territorial integrity of Iraq- find an authentic Iraqi nationalist leader- ensure Iraqi state accepted by neighbors


    19. One only has to look at the current crop of thugs occupying the White House to know that being the brightest and the best is not a criteria for holding office in the Bush administration. Nor, in this election year, does it appear to be a criteria for running for the highest office in the United States. I am old enough, however, to remember when administrations sought out those who were experts in their field and brought them into positions to formulate public policy or, at the least, sought thei [...]


    20. I read this book shortly after it was published, with a preconception of what the author's politics might be, and thus an expectation that I would be repelled. However, he muted that part and my recollection is that he maintained a bland, rational tone. As I think Time and Newsweek do in covering American politics, he made his subject sound like something that yields up its essence to a measured, textbook-style treatment, and made disturbing content seem perhaps not so outrageous after all. I ca [...]


    21. Reading this book in 2012, more than ten years after the events that constitute the bulk of its subject matter, I was aware that for myself the intensity of the anger and frustration sparked by 9/11 had dulled somewhat, the sharp glint of necessity to stamp out the perpetrators and confront the religious zealousness that had motivated them had been reshuffled backwards in our list of priorities as a nation and culture. However, it was not hard to recall how powerful those emotions were, and how [...]


    22. It's interesting to read this book now, because so much has changed from when he wrote it that a lot of it just makes you shake your head. He does have a great grasp of the world in 2001, and he wrote some really compelling columns around that time, and it's kinda amazing that he would travel around Pakistan and Saudi Arabia and even Afghanistan right when all this 9/11 stuff was happening and Daniel Pearl was getting killed and we were starting this war on terror. But there are also lots of mom [...]


    23. I actually never read this book, but its essentially a compression of all of Friedman's post September 11th columns which I did read religiously. Friedman's status as a NYT editorialist and a popular "expert" on globalization and middle eastern culture and conflict has made him a bit of a divisive figure. Policy wonks and partisans hate him because they feel he oversimplifies the subjects he writes about, and his opinions are always tamped by his need to restate both sides of the story. A common [...]


    24. Published in 2002, this volume of columns by Thomas Friedman from before and after the September 11th attacks might be no more than an exercise in the unnerving clarity of hindsight appended by some excellent foreign policy advice and observations. In this regard alone, Longitudes and Attitudes is a captivating piece; Friedman, of course, is an exceptional writer, and his experience with Middle Eastern affairs is unmatched.Now, more than ten years after the publishing of this book, readers of Lo [...]


    25. First off I think that Friedman's earlier book From Beirut to Jerusalem is brilliant and one of the best books on modern Middle East events. That being said, this is not that book. Friedman has some interesting ideas about examining the causes of 9/11. He especially has some insightful points about the cycle of undemocratic authoritarian regimes which often attempt to coopt religion and use it to control the population can help create the anger and frustration fuel support for Al Qaeda. The prob [...]


    26. This book is a collection of Friedman's columns from the NY Times that were published several months before and after 11 Sept 2001 as well as a collection of diary and essays written around the same time. Mr. Friedman's long history of covering the Middle East, his remarkable access to leaders and commoners throughout the region as well as his interest in what they all have to say makes this a remarkable book. As I was listening to the book, I was reminded again of a book by Sandra Day O'Connor [...]


    27. So far - loved the format of this book, a collection of articles that all link together - now I want to read From Beirut to Jerusalemd his newest book. Friedman, I'm coming for you!Most memorable part of the book - just imagining how Muslims treat women. One view would be "omg, how horrible, how could you do that, I am going to come change your culture"But on the other hand, isn't that kind of ridiculous? A culture may seem nonsensical to some, but sometimes people love their culture. "Dads woul [...]


    28. Basically, this is a look back at Sept 11th and its aftermath through the columns of New York Times foreign affairs columnist Thomas Friedman. His insights into (and experience with) the Arabic world are significant and in hindsight very accurate. Only when he lapses into occassional speeches on global warming& the Kyoto treaty, & our need to immediately abandon fossil fuels does he begin to sound like an idiot (Whining about how Americans use up "more than our fair share of energy resou [...]


    29. Reading Friedman's columns from before and after September 11 emphasize how intertwined many of the key issues are - and, 15 years later, how difficult they are to solve. I enjoyed his insights as he traveled through Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Israel, and elsewhere in the months following the attacks, as he tried to unravel the causes and debate solutions. The anger and fear from those early days is palpable, as were the various stages of grief. But more interesting to me was the last third of the [...]


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